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Copyright 2017 - Nappet Tours & Travel | All Rights Reserved

Mission Tours

We provides an opportunity for international Visitors and Christian volunteers to offer their skills to promote sustainable volunteering while in Kenya as they experience Village life and sharing the Love of Christ.

Volunteer Opportunity

Volunteers serve in projects that both pre-existed and will continue after volunteers leave. We ensures that the volunteers investment of resources, time and passion will have a long-term impact.

Our Partners

We are effectively a One-Stop-Solution committed to the sensing and servicing of all tour operations various needs to your valued satisfaction, within Eastern Africa and Kenya particularly.

Watamu Marine National Park and Reserve is located in Kenya. Established in 1968, it was one of Kenya's first marine parks. It is located about 90 miles (140 km) north of Mombasa, Kenya's second largest city. Its coral gardens are merely 300 metres (980 ft) from the shore and are home to approximately 600 species of fish, 110 species of stony coral and countless invertebrates, crustaceans and molluscs.  Water temperature varies from 20 degrees Celsius (June to November) to 30 degrees Celsius (December to May). The park was designated as a biosphere reserve in 1979.


Bleaching of the water in Watamu Marine Park, a marine protected area (MPA), occurred between 1997 and 1998. This was the single most important impact on the sea water that caused high levels of mortality to the coral reefs in Malindi and Watamu. Usually recovery is variable and depends on the reefs but Watamu was slower than average in recovery. Surveys showed that urbanization and coastal development, especially from tourism and agricultural sectors, contributed to increased degradation of the marine environment in the area. Removal of forests and natural vegetation for agriculture, removal of mangroves for building and fuel, and fishing to meet the demands of a growing urban population, all contributed to increased threats on the marine ecosystems of the MPA. This ecosystem includes of coral reefs, mangrove forests and sea grass beds. Land-use plans had to be incorporated into the MPA management plan. The inclusion took into consideration issues of coastal destruction of habitats for marine species including marine turtles and shorebirds, as well as improved enforcement of existing land-use statutes.

 

  1. The Lion
  2. Elephant
  3. Buffalo
  4. Rhino
  5. Leopard
The African lion king of the sub-Saharan savanna, has been admired by man for its beauty and strength for thousands of years. It's one of the most exciting animals to see on safari. These beautiful, large cats are excellent hunters but you're more likely to see one sleeping than hunting. Where to see lions: Nairobi National Park,Masai Mara, Tsavo, and Amboseli National Parks
The African elephant is the largest mammal in the world and remarkably adaptable. Elephants live in woodlands, forests, deserts and savanna, spread across 37 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Elephants are quite peaceful if left alone, but if they feel threatened - watch out. Where to see elephants: Masai Mara & Amboseli National Parks
Buffalo are commonly found in protected wildlife areas (that have plenty of water), throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Four sub-species of African Buffalo have been recognized and basically reflect the different type of regions and habitats they live in: Forest Buffalo; West African Savanna Buffalo; Central African Savanna Buffalo; and Southern Savanna Buffalo. Where to see Buffalo
There are two species of rhino in Africa, the Black rhino and the White rhino. Black rhinos have suffered the most drastic reduction in population in the last 20 years. There are now only about 4000 left in the wild although valiant conservation efforts are increasing those numbers. Where to see Rhino: Lake Nakuru, Tsavo National Parks and Lewa Wildlife Conservancy
The African leopard is more numerous than the African rhino in the Big 5 pantheon, but they are just as difficult to spot on safari in Africa. Leopards use trees as observation platforms and for protection, so you have to remember to look up to see this solitary, beautiful cat. Leopards are shy and nocturnal, quite modest for a cat that can climb, swim and live in a wider range of habitats than most other wild cats. Where to see Leopard: Masai Mara, Tsavo and Amboseli National Parks

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Kenya is a country in East Africa with coastline on the Indian Ocean. It encompasses savannah, lakelands, the dramatic Great Rift Valley, mountain highlands and abundant wildlife such as lions, elephants and rhinos.